Category: COMM11110

COMM11110 Module 7 Blog Topic: is it absolutely critical that all PR campaigns be precisely measurable

Module 7 Blog Topic: Why is it absolutely critical that all PR campaigns be precisely measurable? How would you want to measure such things as campaign expenditure, timelines and results? Should this measurement/evaluation take place throughout the campaign or only at the end? Why? Give at least two references to illustrate your post (250-300 words only).

Figure: Four Keys to a Product Release PR Campaign – Employ a Winning Digital Strategy Source: Jon Ostrow
Figure: Four Keys to a Product Release PR Campaign – Employ a Winning Digital Strategy Source: Jon Ostrow

It is essential that measurement and evaluation should take place all throughout the campaign, as measurement is an important element for a Public Relations campaign (CQUniversity 2015). Wilcox, Cameron, Reber, & Shin (2013) points out that evaluating the impact/results start during in the planning stage in a campaign. As the problem is broken down into measurable goals and objectives; subsequently, after implementing the program, the results are then measured against the goals (Wilcox 2013). According to Wilcox et al. (2013) measuring audience attitudes, and audience awareness can help a PR; moreover, altering the opinions and actions of the audience once they are aware of the message is an important factor in a public relations campaign. Wilcox et al. (2013) remarks that, measurement can consist of analysing leader columns, social media and more. Analysing content for their tone, including the public opinion of the competition and accuracy.
The financial performance of increased income with a decrease in expenditure, as well as avoiding certain costs are what companies drive for in a campaign (Likely & Watson 2013). Evaluation or monitoring throughout a campaign may give suggestions for tactics or organisational stances that could change (CQUniversity 2015). Evaluating expenditure is when you evaluate whether the time and money spent actually accomplished the objective that was set out (Wilcox et al. 2013). Measuring and evaluating the timeline set out during the planning process; this makes room for adjustments if the time set was too strict or harsh (Wilcox et al. 2013). Results are one final aspect to be evaluated or measured in a PR campaign as this is a measurement of every aspect involved (Likely & Watson 2013). Consequently, without an efficient measurement or evaluation of results against the agreed upon objectives that are established during planning process; catastrophes can occur (CQUniversity 2015).

Figure reference

Ostrow, J 2012, Four keys to a product release pr campaign employ a winning digital strategy, digital image, viewed 17 May 2015, http://blog.discmakers.com/2012/10/four-keys-to-a-product-release-pr-campaign-employ-a-winning-digital-strategy/

References

Biz Training 2010, Components of a public relations campaign, video, 26 September, viewed 17 May 2015, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrF-QQYK9r4

CQUniversity 2015, COMM11110 Introduction to Public Relations Module 3: study guide, CQUniversity, CQUniversity e-courses, http://moodle.cqu.edu.au/

Likely F & Watson T 2013, ‘Chapter 8: measuring the edifice: public relations measurement and evaluation practices over the course of 40 years’, in Sriramesh, K, Zerfass, A & Kim, J (eds), Public relations and communication management current trends and emerging topics, pp. 143 – 162, Routledge Taylor and Francis, New York.

Wilcox, D, Cameron, G, Reber, B & Shin, J 2013, Think public relations, 2nd edn, Pearson Education, New Jersey.

COMM11110 Module 6 Blog Topic: How your blog has used presentation to reflect professionalism.

Module 6 Blog Topic:  Using your blog as an example, explain how you have used presentation to reflect professionalism. Justify your post in the context of public relations. Give at least two references to illustrate your post (250-300 words only).

Smith (2011) states that, Blogs and other social media tools have a substantial effect on professional communication. Porter and Sallot (2005 cited in smith 2011, p. 3) state that, PR professionals who utilise blogs in their campaigns create greater expert power and prestige. Blogs alleviate the relationships between organisations and publics by providing stimulating conversation (Seltzer & Mitrook 2007, Vorvoreanu 2006, cited in smith 2011, p. 3). Blogs can also build credibility; whilst, making the client/firm seem more approachable or human (Marken 2006/2007 p. 34, cited in smith 2011, p. 3). ‘A new media specialist, estimated that about 10%-15% of a campaign is spent online and in blogs’ (Smith 2011, p. 5).

Reflecting professionalism in this blog using presentation in the context of public relations can be done in a few ways. According to Wilcox, Cameron, Reber, & Shin (2013), PR can do this by avoiding Jargon words as this can confuse the audience. The module 6 blog avoids clichés and hype words, as these can sabotage the credibility of a message Wilcox et al. (2013). It also avoids mild or vague expressions in a message, as these hide information or mislead readers. Lastly this blog avoids discriminatory language, as this can lead to outrages or loss of clients Wilcox et al. (2013). Being short and sweet as well as using clear, concise messages are best, instead of having large clunky paragraphs that make the reader not want to read the whole thing. Pictures and graphs can also be used to create a sense of professionalism. All my COMM11110: Introduction to Public Relations blogs have fulfilled all of the criteria listed above to make them as professional as possible (Wilcox et al. 2013).

Figure: introduction to blogging Source Gomes M (2014)
Figure: introduction to blogging
Source Gomes M (2014)

Figure Reference

Gomes M 2014, Introduction to blogging, digital image, slide share gallery, viewed 13 May 2015, http://www.slideshare.net/gomesrelations/introduction-to-blogging-42630610

References

Smith, B 2011, ‘Becoming quirky towards an understanding of practitioner and blogger relations in public relations’, Public Relations, vol. 5, no. 4, pp. 1- 17.

Wilcox, D, Cameron, G, Reber, B & Shin, J 2013, Think public relations, 2nd edn, Pearson Education, New Jersey.

COMM11110 Module 3 Blog Topic: Why the words ‘Reliable’, ‘Credible’ ‘Substantiated’ and ‘Accurate’ should be applied to research in PR campaigns

Module 3 Blog Topic:  Why should the words ‘Reliable’, ‘Credible’ ‘Substantiated’ and ‘Accurate’ be applied to any research we might use in a PR campaign? With so much information today online, how can we decide what is safe to use and what isn’t? Give at least two references to illustrate your post (250-300 words only).

‘Credibility’ is a significant variable in the communication process (Wilcox, Cameron, Reber & Shin 2013). Without credible or reliable sources research could be incorrect or misleading; thus creating havoc for a PR campaign. Not only can it create havoc, but it can also cause legal issues if this information is used and is found to be false.
Eunson (2012) remark that, primary and secondary sources can be used as a reliable or credible source when researching. Primary resources may include: questionnaires, interviews, surveys etcetera. Secondary sources may include: journals, research papers, periodicals and more (Costigan 2015). With credible sources implemented, the information written from the research should; therefore, be substantiated or accurate. Wilcox et al. (2013) states that, public relations departments often use online databases to research facts and keep updated in the latest.
However, before a PR starts research; other aspects or important questions are often considered, these may include considerations such as: the time and budget, the importance of the situation etcetera (Wilcox et al. 2013). Thus Wilcox et al. (2013) claims that the audience must perceive the source which is provided as a knowledgeable expert on the subject as well as honest and objective. Nevertheless, before research another aspect to consider when trying to make a message credible is the context, actions speak louder than words or news releases; thereby, if a message says staff are friendly then staff should be friendly otherwise the whole credibility of the message is wasted (Wilcox et al. 2013). To decide or evaluate what is safe and what is not; elements to consider are: does it list an author, are there any sources backing up what is said, is there a connection to what is discussed and is it biased.

Figure 1: Australian PR Evaluation Model Source: PUBLIC RELATIONS INSTITUTE OF AUSTRALIA
Figure 1: Australian PR Evaluation Model
Source: PUBLIC RELATIONS INSTITUTE OF AUSTRALIA

Figure Reference

Public Relations Institute of Australia 2014 (2013), Australian pr evaluation model, digital image, viewed 4 May 2015, http://www.pria.com.au/knowledgebank/area?command=record&id=546

References

Costigan, L 2015, COMM11003 Communication in Professional Contexts: study guide, CQuniversity e-courses, Bundaberg.

Eunson, B 2012, Communicating in the 21st century, 3rd edn, John Wiley & Sons, Milton.

Wilcox, D, Cameron, G, Reber, B & Shin, J 2013, Think public relations, 2nd edn, Pearson Education, New Jersey.

COMM11110 Module 8 Blog Topic: the difference between persuasion and coercion

Module 8 Blog Topic:   What is the difference between persuasion and coercion? Where would you draw the line at using questionable tactics in order to achieve your public relations objective/goal? Give an example of what you consider to be an ethical use of persuasion in PR. Give at least two references to illustrate your post (250-300 words only).

The concept of persuasion has been present a long time throughout history (Wilcox, Cameron, Reber, & Shin 2013). Persuasion is implemented when communication to an audience is intended to induce belief or action. Ten major concepts related to persuasive communication are: audience analysis, creating the audience’s self-interest, to receive audience participation, to receive suggestions for action, to contain source credibility, to provide a clear message, to have precise message structure, employing the correct channels, timing and setting, lastly reinforcement of the message (Wilcox et al. 2013).
The definition of coercion (Cambridge Dictionaries 2015) states that it is to (a) restrain or dominate by nullifying individual will, (b) to compel to an act or choice, (c) to enforce or bring about force or threat. Thus, coercion means making someone do something against their will using intimidation or threats. So the difference between the two is that persuasion is inducing someone to do something with reasoning; whilst, coercion is forcing someone to do something by intimidating or threatening them, which is not only immoral; but to threaten someone is something which could be legally frowned upon.
The line should therefore be drawn at ethical persuasion, as coercion is an immoral and legally frowned upon action. Wilcox et al. (2013) provides an example of ethical persuasion in public relations which is the Ivy Lee Rockefellers and coal industry case. Where Ivy Lee used his research to inform/persuade the Rockefellers on the best course of action; for instance, when he persuaded the mining company to send an open thank you letter to the miners. Following that, when he persuaded John D. Rockefeller, Jr to visit the Ludlow mines where he interacted with the miners. This public relations case is often referred to as the beginning of modern industrial public relations (Wilcox et al. 2013).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Figure 1: Ivy Ledbetter Lee Founder of Modern Public Relations GHM-115-7-Polk Co Source: Groundspeak 2015 (2008) digital image,Waymark Gallery, viewed 3 May 2015, http://www.waymarking.com/gallery/default.aspx?f=1&guid=789dff2d-fc0e-4c34-beb1-6b1f70ab3b2e&gid=2

Figure References
Groundspeak 2015 (2008), Ivy Ledbetter Lee founder of modern public relations GHM-115-7-Polk Co, digital image, Waymark Gallery, viewed 3 May 2015, http://www.waymarking.com/gallery/default.aspx?f=1&guid=789dff2d-fc0e-4c34-beb1-6b1f70ab3b2e&gid=2

References

Cambridge Dictionaries 2015, Coercion, viewed 3 May 2015, http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/coercion

Wilcox, D, Cameron, G, Reber, B & Shin, J 2013, Think public relations, 2nd edn, Pearson Education, New Jersey.

COMM11110 – Module 2 blog topic: The earliest PR campaign you can find

Module 2 Blog Topic: What is the earliest PR campaign you can find? What are the signs that this is to do with PR and not simply advertising? Is there anything in the campaign that could not be used today? Why not? Give at least two references to illustrate your post.

Public Relations Institute of Australia (2015) provides the definition of public relations as being a deliberate, planned and sustained effort to establish and maintain mutual understanding between the client and the public. Public relations practitioners evaluate public attitudes, they identify the policies and procedures of a client with the public interest. After that they then plan and execute a program of action to earn understanding and acceptance (Public Relations Institute of Australia 2015).

Wilcox, Cameron, Reber, & Shin (2013) states that, the earliest PR campaign that is not simply advertising is Ivy Ledbetter Lee’s public relations dealings as a consultant to the Rockefeller family and CF&I company during the Ludlow Massacre in April 1929. The first sign that it was to do with PR and not simply advertising, was his first advice talking Rockefeller out of using advertising as a form of combating negative publicity (Wilcox et al. 2013). The second sign that it was not simply advertising was, that he communicated to all parties involved; thereby, making his assessment of public opinion to inform his public relations tactics. Lee utilised information from the press and articles to advise him on the best course of action. Ivy Ledbetter attended government hearings giving frequent testimonials for the Rockefellers and CF&I (Wilcox et al. 2013).

Through his use of public relations; Ivy Ledbetter Lee managed to prevent United Mine Workers from gaining a position in the CF&I mines. He was later to be named one of the forefathers’ of public relations, making four important contributions to public relations. Well, in today’s ethical rules I do not believe that the false or incorrect information that was used in the leaflets would have been allowed, but, other than that I am unsure what else could not be used today in Public Relations.

Figure 1: Public-relations-history-getting-where-you-want-to-go-by-knowing-where-youve-been-1-728 Source: Tullier M 2009 (2010)
Figure 1: Public-relations-history-getting-where-you-want-to-go-by-knowing-where-youve-been-1-728 Source: Tullier M 2009 (2010)

Figure Reference

Tullier M 2009 (2010), Public relations history getting where you want to go by knowing where you’ve been 1 728, digital image, APR slide share, viewed 11 May 2015,http://image.slidesharecdn.com/publicrelationshistory-100416215134-phpapp01/95/public-relations-history-getting-where-you-want-to-go-by-knowing-where-youve-been-1-728.jpg?cb=1271456300

References

Public Relations Institute of Australia 2015, History, viewed 11 May 2015, http://www.pria.com.au/aboutus/overview-and-corporate-profile/overview-and-corporate-profile

Wilcox, D, Cameron, G, Reber, B & Shin, J 2013, Think public relations, 2nd edn, Pearson Education, New Jersey.